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Work Flows to Ranger’s New Pipe Crews

One of Ranger's new pipe crews includes Hoe Operator James “Lee” Lucas and Pipe Layers Bruce Morgan, Byron Walker and Tommy Walker, shown getting ready to install 72” drainage pipe at Botanica, a site development project in Jupiter, Florida. Foreman Brian Kennedy and Pipe Layer Juan Bravo not shown.

One of Ranger’s new pipe crews includes Hoe Operator James “Lee” Lucas and Pipe Layers Bruce Morgan, Byron Walker and Tommy Walker, shown getting ready to install 72” drainage pipe at Botanica, a site development project in Jupiter, Florida. Foreman Brian Kennedy and Pipe Layer Juan Bravo not shown.

As one of Florida’s largest heavy/highway contracting firms, Ranger Construction has the equipment, personnel and bonding capacity to handle virtually any size project.

But when submitting bids for projects involving large amounts of pipe work, Ranger at times has been hampered by the limited availability of underground subcontractors.

“When subcontractors’ schedules are full, it’s hard for them to take on even more work at their most competitive price,” said Leo Vecellio, Jr., President and CEO of Ranger Construction’s parent company, the Vecellio Group. “That makes it difficult for us as a prime contractor to consistently turn in our most competitive bids for those projects.”

Taking the lead from Ranger’s North Division, which already operates its own pipe crews to supplement the use of subcontractors, Ranger’s Central Division and Ranger Construction – South have added pipe crews, as well. The expansion gives Ranger the ability to bid projects involving pipe work more competitively throughout its market areas.

James “Lee” Lucas runs a Loader to move segments of 72”drainage pipe at the Botanica site development project in Jupiter, Florida.

James “Lee” Lucas runs a Loader to move segments of 72”drainage pipe at the Botanica site development project in Jupiter, Florida.

“We’re not necessarily reducing the amount of pipe work we subcontract; we’re increasing the amount of new work we can take on,” explained Glenn Monek, a veteran pipe manager who oversees Ranger Central’s underground crews.

Since these contracts generally include grading and paving work, Ranger benefits from an increase in its overall workload, as well.

“It works out for everyone,” said Mike Slade, president of Ranger’s Central Division. “It’s good for our customers, who get the best price and work schedules. It’s good for us, because we can bid more work and be more competitive. And it’s good for our subcontractors, who continue to play a major role as we take on larger and more complex projects.”

Byrd White, president of Ranger Construction – South, agreed. “Most large projects involve substantial underground work. With our expanded pipe crews, we are in a better position to manage the increased workload.”